Monday, April 30, 2007

Save Our Neighborhoods Coalition: 'WE ASK CITY COUNCIL TO VOTE "NO" ON THIS ANNEXATION!'


SAVE OUR NEIGHBORHOODS COALITION
“NO ANNEXATION”
Sign
Valley Way, Carmel, CA.

The unanimous recommendation of the Planning Commission to deny Robert Leidig’s application to annex the former Carmel Convalescent Hospital property to the city on Tuesday, 11 April 2007 was to be on the Tuesday, 1 May 2007 City Council agenda. However, the applicant, Robert Leidig, and his attorney, Derinda Messenger, apparently requested a one or two month delay to give them time to address all of the concerns and protests of the residents of the neighborhood.

Of interest, as follows, Planning Commission “Minutes,” AMBAG Clearinghouse Newsletter, TAMC letter to the city and summary of Save Our Neighborhoods Coalition advertisement:


CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA
PLANNING COMMISSION
Regular Meeting
April 11, 2007


Commissioners:
PRESENT: Commission Members Alan Hewer, Steven Hillyard, Robin Wilson
ABSENT: Commission Members Karen Sharp, Chairman Bill Strid

PUBLIC HEARING
ZC 06-1
Robert Leidig
Valley Way & Highway 1
APN: 009-061-002, 003,005

Consideration of recommendations to the City Council on annexation and pre-zoning requests for a property of approximately 3.7 acres located on the north side of Valley Way, about 100 feet east of Monterey Street. The Planning Commission will consider the applicant’s request to pre-zone the property to an R-4 classification, and may review other zoning options. The Planning Commission also will review an environmental Initial Study and proposed Negative Declaration. The Planning Commission will forward all recommendations to the City Council for action.

The public hearing was opened; approximately 30 of the 80 individuals present spoke against annexation to the city, against a zoning change to R-2 and for an environmental impact report. The public hearing was closed.

A motion was made to deny annexation, carried by the following roll call vote:

AYES: COMMISSIONERS: Hewer, Hillyard, Wilson
NOES: None
ABSENT: COMMISSIONERS: Sharp, Strid


AMBAG
Clearinghouse Monthly Notification
Association of Monterey Bay Area Governments

P.O. Box 809
Marina, CA 93933-0809
(831) 883-3750
CLEARINGHOUSE NEWSLETTER
March 2007

ENVIRONMENTAL DOCUMENTS

20070206 Mitigated Negative Declaration (MND)
Leidig/Carmel Convalescent Hospital Annexation Project
Contact: Brian Roseth
(831) 620-2010
City of Carmel-by-the-Sea
(479)
Annexation of a property Approx. 3.62 acres into the Ctity of Carmel-by-the-Sea. No development is proposed at this time.
Project is located in the county of Monterey .
Public review period ends Thursday, March 22, 2007.


TAMC Letter to Mr. Brian Roseth
March 21, 2007


Debra L. Hale
Executive Director
558 Plaza Circle. Salinas. CA 9390 1-2902 • Tel: (83 11 775•0903 • Fax: (831) 775-0897 • Website: www.tamcmonlerey.org

TAMC
Transportation Agency For Monterey County

SUBJECT: Comments on Mitigated Negative Declaration for the
Leidig I Carmel Convalescent Hospital Annexation Project

The Transportation Agency requests the following changes to the mitigation measures:

MM 15-1: Following annexation, future development projects shall be required to provide project specific and cumulative condition traffic analyses at the time of application.

MM 15-3: Following annexation, each future development project shall be required to contribute its fair share of the local and region al fees for traffic impact mitigation, as identified by the City and the Transportation Agencv for Monterey County's Nexus S/II(/\' for a Regional Del'elofJlI/elll III/pact Fee, which may include the St ate Rout e I reimbursement program, prior to the issuance of building or grading permit s for the development of the property.


Save Our Neighborhoods Coalition Advertisement

A “Save Our Neighborhoods Coalition” advertisement in The Carmel Pine Cone (April 20, 2007) stated “Carmelites Opposed to Carmel Convalescent Hospital Annexation on Valley Way & Highway 1, You Be The Judge...” The advertisement then compared the proposed development to the Barnyard.

Proposed Development vs. Barnyard, as follows:
3.68 acres vs. 3.41 acres
70,000 sq. ft. vs. 71,000 sq. ft.
2 stories, 30 ft. height vs. 2 stories, 35 ft. height
30 – 45 + condominiums vs. 50 retail spaces
Gross total floor area: 94,500 sq. ft. vs. 91,000 sq. ft.

The advertisement then stated, as follows:
WE SAY “NO” TO HIGH DENSITY!!’

At the end of the advertisement:
“WE ASK CITY COUNCIL TO VOTE “NO” ON THIS ANNEXATION!”

Saturday, April 28, 2007

FOREST THEATRE NATIVE PLANTS LANDSCAPE RESTORATION PROJECT: The Hilton Bialek Biological Sciences Habitat, Carmel Middle School & Carmel High School


Forest Theater
Mt. View Av. between Santa Rita St. & Guadalupe St.
Irrigation Tubing Installed by the Regional Occupational Program (ROP) Ornamental Horticultural Class of Carmel High School
Date: Thursday, 26 April 2007

Forest Theatre Landscape Restoration Project & The Hilton Bialek Biological Sciences Habitat

“The Hilton Bialek Biological Sciences Habitat at Carmel Middle School is one of the most unique environmental education centers in the nation.”

“Our mission is to inspire students to understand, appreciate and protect the natural environment.”

Craig Hohenberger, Director
Jane Atkins, Habitat Restoration Coordinator and Nursery Manager
Ellen Fondiler, Habitat Manager & Director of Development

Community Restoration Projects include the Carmel River Lagoon, Carmel Beach and Lester Rowntree Arboretum.
For more information about the Hilton Bialek Biological Sciences Habitat, click on the post title above, or copy, paste and click, http://www.carmelhabitat.org/


The Forest Theatre Landscape Restoration Project is made possible principally by the Hilton Bialek Biological Sciences Habitat, Director Craig Hohenberger, Habitat Restoration Coordinator and Nursery Manager Jane Atkins and Habitat Manager & Director of Development Ellen Fondiler, Carmel Middle School students and the Regional Occupational Program (ROP) Ornamental Horticultural Carmel High School class students. The students designed the project, planned the work and got involved and participated in local government seeking grants, preparing presentations to commissions and working with the city to launch and accomplish this ambitious 3 year project.

UPDATE: On Thursday, 26 April 2007, Carmel High School students laid the irrigation tubing down into the mini-trenches. This irrigation will provide water by drip irrigation to the soon-to-be planted native trees and scrubs.

BACKGROUND: The Landscape Restoration Project is comprised of 3 phases, A, B and C; one phase is to be accomplished each year over 3 years. Phase A is being accomplished and completed now. The restoration of the Forest Theatre grounds, that is, the planting of native trees and shrubs that grew there historically, will at long last achieve a goal of the Forest Theatre Master Plan of the City’s Local Coastal Program.

NOTE: Anticipate the completion of Phase A, with the planting of native, drought-tolerant plants, in the near future.

Thursday, April 26, 2007

City Reserve Policy: “at least 10% of its annual revenues”

In the April 20, 2007 issue of The Carmel Pine Cone, reporter Mary Brownfield wrote, as follows:

“Job cuts in 2004 and 2005 helped the city bring its reserve fund balances up to an above-average $8.4 million from a 2003 low of $4 million. Some of the savings could be used for capital projects in the coming years, though city policy required reserves to be at least 10 percent of its annual revenues, expected to exceed $12 million in 2006/07.”
(Source: Wall Street gives Carmel good grades, Mary Brownfield, The Carmel Pine Cone, April 20, 2007, page 13A.)

Review the following “Fund Balances” from the CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA California, Annual Financial Reports, completed by Nicholson & Olson, Certified Public Accountants.

CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA
California
Annual Financial Report
June 30, 2006


BALANCE SHEET
Government Funds
June 30, 2006

FUND BALANCES
Reserved for debt service: $627,309

Unreserved:
Designated: $5,359,692
Reserved: $552,884 (Parking)
Undesignated: $3,053,341

Total Fund Balances: $9,040,342 $552,884

TOTAL: $9,593,226.00
Note: $9,593,226 represents an increase of $694,804 over the previous fiscal year.

(Source: Financial Statements, CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA, BALANCE SHEET, Government Funds, June 30, 2006, CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA, California, Annual Financial Report, June 30, 2006.)

COMMENTS:
Apparently, according to reporter Mary Brownfield, the City of Carmel-by-the-Sea has a policy requiring reserves to be at least 10% of its annual revenues. Annual revenues of $12 million in fiscal year 2006/07 translate into a reserve minimum of $1.2 million, compared to an audited amount of $9.6 million.

Note: For a related post, see the Carmel-by-the-Sea WATCHDOG!, Sunday, March 25, 2007, ATTENTION CARMELITES: Now is the Time for an Honest & Informed Debate over City Reserve Policy by clicking on the post title above.

Wednesday, April 25, 2007

The Carmel-by-the-Sea Garden Club Dedicates Renovated Garden in Garden Ceremony


Harrison Memorial Library Garden
Pre-Renovation Appearance

Harrison Memorial Library Garden
Renovation Project courtesy of The Carmel-by-the-Sea Garden Club
Completed by Craven Landscaping April 2007

Harrison Memorial Library's People with Disabilities Pathway from Dolores St. to Library Entrance

Harrison Memorial Library's People with Disabilities Entrance through Glass Door

WHO:
The Carmel-by-the-Sea Garden Club & Craven Landscaping

The Carmel-by-the-Sea Garden Club was established in 1979 by “a group of women who shared a love of gardening.”
For more information, including information about Public Events, Community Projects, Advice, et cetera, click on post title above or copy, paste and click
http://www.carmelgardenclub.com/

Craven Landscaping
“Monterey Peninsula’s Top Landscape Specialist
Serving the Monterey Peninsula since 1975”

343 Roberts Avenue, Seaside, CA 93955
Telephone: (831) 394-6967

WHAT: Garden Ceremony for the dedication of the “Newly Remodeled” Harrison Memorial Library Garden

WHEN: Wednesday, April 25, 2007, 11:00 A.M.

WHERE: Harrison Memorial Library
Ocean Av. & Lincoln St. N.E. Corner
Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA.

HOW: Funding from Private Donations

WHY: Beautification!

Tuesday, April 24, 2007

City of Carmel-by-the-Sea Violates Local Coastal Program, Municipal Code & Superior Court Judge's Ruling


Detached Ivy from Exterior Wall of Flanders Mansion
Mission Trail Nature Preserve
Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA.

Water-Filled Pothole in the Driveway of the Flanders Mansion
Mission Trail Nature Preserve
Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA.

Instead of expeditiously complying with Judge Robert O’Farrell’s decision to maintain the Flanders Mansion property forthwith, the city instructed Special Counsel William Conners to file an objection to the decision, arguing that the City of Carmel-by-the-Sea is not obligated to maintain the National Register of Historic Places Flanders Mansion.

Selected excerpts regarding preservation, protection, rehabilitation, et cetera, from the City of Carmel-by-the-Sea’s General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan Land Use & Community Character Element, as follows:

The City is charged with protecting and preserving the established design character of Carmel as well as its historic resources.

Cultural Resources and Historic Preservation
Historic resources are an important element of Carmel-by-the-Sea's community character. These resources and the City's approach to protecting them are discussed below. (LUP)

Most of Carmel-by-the-Sea's historic buildings exhibit myriad detailing, some of it intricate and some bold: surfaces are broken up by ridges, insets, decorative tiles, cavities, niches and abrupt changes of material; textures exhibit a great variety, from smooth-troweled plaster, brick, stone, rock or exposed aggregate to painted, carved or unfinished wood; corners often include bevels, bullnoses, cornices and moldings. (LUP)

Protection of Historic Resources
Although the Coastal Act does not specifically discuss historic preservation, this topic is related to the preservation of character required by sections 30251 and 30253 of the Act. The purpose of this component of the Land Use Plan is to provide a framework for policies that address the preservation of the diverse and valuable historic resources in Carmel. Its primary goals are to educate residents and visitors about the unique architectural, cultural and historic identity of Carmel-by-the-Sea, and to promote the identification and preservation of structures and sites that best represent this history. The addition of this component to the Coastal Plan reflects Carmel’s commitment to the preservation of its important historic resources and the City’s recognition of the role that historic resources play in defining community character. (LUP)

All these significant historic resources contribute to the City and its Sphere of Influence. They help to create a unique identity for the City that promotes Carmel as an attractive place for both residents and visitors. These buildings and sites serve as important reminders of Carmel’s rich history and the patterns in which it developed. Extending beyond its contributions to the quality of life in Carmel, preservation of cultural resources also provides direct economic benefits by maintaining the character and charm that makes this an attractive visitor destination.

Preservation requires that historic resources be protected and rehabilitated without changes that would damage their integrity. Specific historic resources will be preserved after identification through an ongoing survey and then implementing preservation programs that are effective. Only changes consistent with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties will be allowed unless environmental review demonstrates that this is not feasible. (LUP)

A greater understanding of and appreciation for the cultural heritage of Carmel can be fostered through a comprehensive historic preservation program. This includes the preservation of local architectural resources and archaeological artifacts and sites, as well as conservation of the landscape features such as the parks, seashore, roadside greenbelts and natural setting that have played an integral role in making Carmel what it is today. This program will help to promote an ethic of cultural stewardship, encouraging the entire community to become actively involved in retaining and protecting these special resources of Carmel-by-the-Sea. (LUP)

Cultural Resources
Historic Preservation

G1-4 Promote the identification and preservation of historic resources including buildings, structures, objects, sites, districts, and archaeological resources that represent the unique architectural, cultural, and historic and prehistoric identity of Carmel-by-the-Sea. The definition of historic resources shall include the built environment, prehistoric resources and historic archaeological resources. (LUP)

P1-92 Notify property owners upon identification of each historic resource included in the Carmel Inventory. Provide information to property owners on the City’s preservation program and explain the benefits and responsibilities of owning an historic resource. Encourage owners to place their historic resource on National, State or Local Registers to maximize potential benefits to the owner and to the public. (LUP)

P1-94 Establish a process to help preserve and provide public recognition of historic resources. (LUP)

P1-101 Use the State Historical Building Code for historic buildings and properties. Foster a greater understanding of this Code among architects and building professionals. (LUP)

P1-102 Minimize adverse impacts to historic resources from natural disasters by promoting seismic safety, flood protection, and other building safety programs. Ensure the preservation of historic resources identified in the Carmel Inventory through the development and implementation of an effective emergency response plan. (LUP)

G1-5 Protect and enhance historic resources. Ensure that City ordinances, development review processes and administrative policies support, facilitate and coordinate with preservation activities. Provide incentives for property owners to preserve and rehabilitate historic resources. (LUP)

O1-16 Pursue and support the use of appropriate Federal, State, local and private grants, loans, tax credits, and tax relief. Develop or assist financial, technical, and legal assistance programs to encourage or assist with rehabilitation and maintneance. Participate in the State and Federal preservation process and programs. Make application to the State for becoming a Certified Local Government (CLG), which enables the City to receive technical training. (LUP)

P1-104 Prohibit demolition of all historic resources and prohibit changes to historic resources that are inconsistent with the Secretary of Interior's Standards and Guidelines unless it is determined through environmental review that alternatives consistent with the Secretary of Interior Standards are not feasible. When completing environmental review of any project affecting an historic resource, require exploration of one or more alternative designs that would be consistent with the Secretary of the Interior's Standards and Guidelines Standards. (LUP)

P1-105 Apply the Design Review Guidelines to ensure preservation, protection, enhancement, rehabilitation, reconstruction, and perpetuation of existing structures of historic significance in a manner consistent with the character of the village. Such criteria shall include, but not be limited to, architectural design, size, scale, height, spatial relationships, window, dormers, appurtenances, proportion and placement of improvements on the parcel, and landscaping, including planting or removal of vegetation. (LUP)

P1-106 Recognize existing architectural features and styles when reviewing alterations to historic resources. Strive to achieve compatibility between these historic elements and proposed changes. Allow historic resources included in the Carmel Inventory to retain existing land use and/or design nonconformities when proposed rehabilitation or repairs are found to be consistent with the Secretary of Interior's Standards and Guidelines. Allow changes to historic resources in the Carmel Inventory that expand an existing design nonconformity or create a new design nonconformity only when this is found to be necessary to achieve consistency with the Secretary or Interior's Standards and Guidelines. (LUP)

P1-107 Minimize adverse impacts to historic resources from natural disasters by promoting seismic safety, flood protection, and other building safety programs. Ensure the preservation of resources identified in the Carmel Inventory through the development and implementation of an effective emergency response plan. Prohibit and adopt penalties for intentional neglect and/or vandalism of historic resources (“demolition by neglect”). (LUP)

And relevant portion of the City’s Municipal Code, as follows:
Chapter 17.32
HISTORIC PRESERVATION
17.32.210 Maintenance and Upkeep.
A. Minimum Maintenance.
1. All resources included in the inventory shall be preserved against decay and deterioration, kept in a state of good repair and free from structural defects. The purpose of this section is to prevent an owner or other person having legal custody and control over a property from facilitating demolition of a historic resource by neglecting it and by permitting damage to it by weather and/or vandalism.

2. Consistent with all other State and City codes requiring that buildings and structures be kept in good repair, the owner or other person having legal custody and control of a property shall repair such building or structure if it is found to have any of the following defects.

a. Building elements so attached that they may fall and injure members of the public or property.

b. Deteriorated or inadequate foundation.

c. Defective or deteriorated flooring.

d. Members of walls, partitions or other vertical supports that split, lean, list or buckle due to defective material or deterioration.

e. Members of ceilings, roofs, ceilings or roof supports or other horizontal members which that sag, split or buckle due to defective materials or deterioration.

f. Fireplaces or chimneys that list, bulge or settle due to defective material or deterioration.

g. Deteriorated, crumbling or loose exterior plaster.

h. Deteriorated or ineffective waterproofing of exterior walls, roofs, foundations or floors, including broken windows or doors.

i. Defective or lack of weather protection for exterior wall coverings, including lack of paint, or weathering due to lack of paint or other protective covering.

j. Any fault, defect or deterioration in the building which that renders it structurally unsafe or not properly watertight.

3. If the Building Official determines that a historic resource or any other property is being neglected and subject to damage from weather or vandalism, the Director and/or Building Official shall meet with the owner or other person having legal custody and control of the historic resource to discuss with them ways to improve the condition of the property. If no attempt or insufficient effort is made to correct any noted conditions thereafter, the Building Official may issue a notice to comply requiring the owner or other person having legal custody and control of the historic resource to take action to require corrections of defects in the subject property in order that such historic resource may be preserved in accordance with this section.

Addendum:
Recently, water to the Flanders Mansion was shut off at the water meter next to the building near the garage. Reason: Unknown

Monday, April 23, 2007

$66,380: Total City Compensation to Special Counsel William B. Conners (March 2005 - March 2007)


Springtime at Flanders Mansion
Mission Trail Nature Preserve
Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA.

TOTAL CITY MONETARY AMOUNT TO SPECIAL COUNSEL WILLIAM B. CONNERS
M76728, FLANDERS FOUNDATION v. CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA et al. (March 2005 – March 2007):


TOTAL: $66,380.00 (March 2005 - March 2007)
112637 3/20/07 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 800.00 LEGAL SERVICES-FLANDERS LAWSUIT

112355 2/13/07 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $12,040.00 LEGAL SERVICES-FLANDERS LAWSUIT

112054 12/22/06 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 7,980.00 LEGAL SERVICES-FLANDERS LAWSUIT
112165 1/16/07 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 4,440.00 LEGAL SERVICES-FLANDERS LAWSUIT
----Vendor Total---- $ 12,420.00

111794 11/14/06 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 4,660.00 LEGAL SERVICES-FLANDERS LAWSUIT

111606 10/17/06 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 1,920.00 LEGAL SERVICES-FLANDERS LAWSUIT

111097 8/8/06 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 260.00 LEGAL SERVICES-FLANDERS LAWSUIT
111150 8/15/06 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 500.00 LEGAL SERVICES-FLANDERS LAWSUIT
----Vendor Total---- $ 760.00

110707 6/13/06 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 580.00 LEGAL SERVICES-FLANDERS LAWSUIT

110419 5/2/06 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 1,400.00 LEGAL SERVICES-FLANDERS LAWSUIT
110570 5/23/06 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 540.00 LEGAL SERVICES-FLANDERS LAWSUIT
----Vendor Total---- $ 1,940.00

110141 3/21/06 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 880.00 LEGAL SERVICES – FLANDERS LAWSUIT

110014 2/28/06 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 3,780.00 JAN '06 LEGAL SERVICES

109798 1/24/06 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 1,260.00 LEGAL SERVICES

109626 12/27/05 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 1,780.00 LEGAL SERVICES-FLANDERS

109353 11/15/05 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 40.00 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

109165 10/11/05 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 7,220.00 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

108976 9/13/2005 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 4,280.00 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

108897 8/30/05 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 2,520.00 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

108622 7/20/05 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 2,940.00 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

108410 6/14/05 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 2,360.00 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

108242 5/24/05 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 2,660.00 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

107869 3/22/05 WILLIAM B. CONNERS $ 1,540.00 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

(Source: Carmel-by-the-Sea California - Official City Website http://www.ci.carmel.ca.us/ March 2005 – March 2007 Check Registers)

Sunday, April 22, 2007

PART IV (of IV): Forest & Beach Commission's Violations of Municipal Code, Land Use Plan, Recommended Tree Species List & USDA Forest Service Policy


Monterey Pine Trees in "Urbanized" Forest
Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA.

A Monterey Peninsula resident shared the following email sent a couple of weeks ago to Acting City Forester Mike Branson. The email expresses concerns about the apparent change in forest policy regarding the planting of Canary Island Pine trees in place of native Monterey Pine trees. Acting City Forester Mike Branson has failed to respond to the individual’s questions and/or defend the city’s actions.


One of your predecessors, City Forester Gary Kelly viewed the Monterey pine as Carmel-by-the-Sea’s “signature tree.”

The City’s Recommended Tree Species List states “Monterey pines (Pinus radiata) and cypresses (Cypressus macrocarpa) are the primary upper canopy trees of the forest and the planting of these species shall receive the greatest priority in appropriate situations.

The City’s LUP supports the “signature tree” and recommended tree species ideas and more.

It is essential that these and other policy directives be carried out to ensure that the Monterey pine forest landscape is protected so that the forested character of this unique coastal village is preserved. (LUP)

G5-4 Preserve and enhance the City's legacy of an urbanized forest of predominantly Monterey pine, coast live oak and Monterey Cypress. (LUP)

P5-58 Maintain, restore and enhance a predominantly indigenous forest of native Monterey pines and coast live oaks. (LUP)

P5-63 Manage the tree-planting program to achieve an uneven-aged, healthy forest with particular emphasis on native Monterey pines and coast live oaks. (LUP)

P5-80 Plant native Monterey pine seedlings of different genotypes to maximize resistance to diseases and make these seedlings available to the public. (LUP)

Yet at a meeting of the Forest and Beach Commission, Monterey Pines which are approved for removal are invariably replaced by the recommendation of the Forest and Beach Commission with Canary Island Pines. Canary Island Pines (P. canariensis) are exotic, whereas Monterey Pines (P. radiate) are native.

FYI: From USDA Forest Service.

Given the problems with pitch canker, why plant Monterey pines at all?
In most urban environments, one may opt to avoid any risk of damage from pitch canker by utilizing non-susceptible species as landscape trees. But in a native Monterey pine forest and at the urbanized border of such a forest, planting exotic species will degrade the integrity of a limited natural rresource. If Monterey pines that are lost to pitch canker are replaced with non-native tree species, the loss to the native forest will be made permanent. As an alternative, killed trees can be replaced with Monterey pines that are genetically resistant to pitch canker, thereby helping to sustain this species in its native habitat.
http://frap.cdf.ca.gov/pitch_canker/research/index.html

Moreover, since there is available today known resistant seedlings from a reputable source, there is no reason for the Monterey Pine to be supplanted by the Canary Island Pine or any other tree. Just ask Friends of Carmel Forest, the group who just recently gave away pitch canker resistant Monterey Pine seedlings.

Given all of the above, can you give me the reason why the Canary Island Pine has been substituted for the “signature” Monterey Pine? Furthermore, at the very least, prior to recommending the Canary Island Pine in lieu of the Monterey Pine, the City’s Recommended Tree Species List should be changed to reflect this new reality and the LUP should be properly amended with the California Coastal Commission advised.

Finally, do you as City Forester and the Forest and Beach Commission members realize that your actions will dramatically alter Carmel-by-the-Sea’s distinctive, character defining urbanized forest as a forest of “signature” Monterey Pines?

Saturday, April 21, 2007

PART III (of IV): Forest & Beach Commission's Violation of Municipal Code, Land Use Plan, Recommended Tree Species List & USDA Forest Service Policy


Monterey Pine
Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA.
For comparison purposes, click on post title above for a photo of a mature Canary Island Pine.

Monterey Pine (Pinus radiata) vs. Canary Island Pine (Pinus canariensis)

Monterey Pine (Pinus radiata)
Origin: California (Central Coast)

SPECIES CHARACTERISTICS:
Evergreen, conifer tree. Fast growth rate, 40 - 100' in height, up to 150’ - 200’ in height, 30 - 40' spread. Broad irregular open crown. Needles in 2's or 3's, 3 - 6" long bright green.
For photo: Copy, paste and click, http://www.californiabiota.com/cabiota/monterey_pine.htm

Scientific classification

Kingdom: Plantae

Division: Pinophyta

Class: Pinopsida

Order: Pinales

Family: Pinaceae

Genus: Pinus

Subgenus: Pinus

Species: P. radiata

• Native to coastal California in three very limited areas in Santa Cruz, Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties, and (as the variety Pinus radiata var. binata) on Guadalupe Island and Cedros Island off the west coast of Baja California, Mexico.

• Leaves ('needles') are bright green, in clusters of three (two in var. binata), slender, 8-15 cm long and with a blunt tip.

• Cones are 7-17 cm long, brown, ovoid (egg-shaped), and usually set asymmetrically on a branch, attached at an oblique angle.

• Bark is fissured and dark grey to brown

Canary Island Pine (Pinus canariensis)
Identified by their tall and slender structure.

SPECIES CHARACTERISTICS:
Evergreen, conifer tree. Fast growth rate, 50 - 80' in height, 30' spread. Pyramidal in shape. Bluish-green needles in threes, 9 - 12" long.

For more information and photo, click on post title above or copy, paste and click
http://www.delange.org/PineCanary/PineCanary.htm

Scientific classification

Kingdom: Plantae

Division: Pinophyta

Class: Pinopsida

Order: Pinales

Family: Pinaceae

Genus: Pinus

Subgenus: Pinus

Species: P. canariensis

• Native to the outer Canary Islands (Gran Canaria, Tenerife, Gomera, Hierro, La Palma) in the Atlantic Ocean.

• Subtropical pine

• One of the most drought tolerant pines

• Evergreen, conifer tree

• Cones are 10-23 cm long, glossy chestnut-brown in color


Forest Management Plan
Appendix G

CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA
RECOMMENDED TREE SPECIES LIST


Monterey pines (Pinus radiata) and cypresses (Cypressus macrocarpa) are the primary upper canopy trees of the forest and the planting of these species shall receive the greatest priority in appropriate situations.

COMMENTS:
Monterey Pines are native to a limited number of areas in the world, coastal Monterey County being one of those rare places. The “signature tree” of Carmel-by-the-Sea, it defines Carmel's upper canopy.

In 2006, regarding the incidence of pitch canker, California Pitch Canker Task Force Co-Chairman Stephen Staub stated, "It's definitely a significant issue, but certainly not to the degree we once thought it was." And Co-Chairman of the California Pitch Canker Task Force and Professor of Plant Pathology at the University of California, Davis, Tom Gordon, concured; he stated of his research, “...many trees did not die and instead recovered from the disease. The recovery was due in part to induced resistance. That is, infections by the pitch canker pathogen caused trees to manifest elevated resistance to subsequent infections...Consequently, our present understanding of the disease suggests that future mortality caused by pitch canker will be much lower than originally anticipated.” Moreover, recent research by Professor Gordon et al concluded, “The combined effects of disease escape, inherent genetic resistance and systemic induced resistance (SIR), should allow the Monterey pine forest to adapt to the pitch canker pathogen over time.”

Whereas, Canary Island Pine trees are non-native, “exotic,” tropical, “Christmas tree-like” trees. And at maturity they do not reach a height comparable to Monterey Pine trees and therefore would not replace the upper canopy. Furthermore, Canary Island Pine trees have been found infected with pitch canker fungus in the field, although studies have shown Canary Island Pines to be more resistant to pitch canker.
(Reference: http://frap.cdf.ca.gov/pitch_canker/research/pitchcan.html, McCain et al., 1987; Storer and Dallara 1992; Storer et al., 1994b)

INTERESTING FACTS:
Pitch canker is a disease of conifers caused by the fungus Fusarium subglutinans f. sp. pini. Bark, twig, and cone beetles are implicated as vectors (carriers) of this pathogen.

Naturally infected species include Monterey Pine and Canary Island Pine.
(Source: http://frap.cdf.ca.gov/pitch_canker/prevention_management/treenotes.html)

Natural infections of Monterey pine in California were not seen until 1986 when the pathogen was isolated from symptomatic tissue in Santa Cruz County (McCain et al., 1987).
(Source: http://frap.cdf.ca.gov/pitch_canker/research/pitchcan.html)

Friday, April 20, 2007

PART II (of IV): Forest & Beach Commission's Violation of Municipal Code, Land Use Plan, Recommended Tree Species List & USDA Forest Service Policy


Monterey Pine Trees
Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA.

THE CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA MUNICIPAL CODE:

Carmel-by-the-Sea
Municipal Code

Chapter 17.48
TREES AND SHRUBS
17.48.010 Purpose.
The City Council finds that in order to preserve windbreaks, reduce soil erosion, and preserve the natural beauty of the City’s urbanized forest, it is necessary to maintain the extent and health of the dominant Monterey Pine forest, along with other native tree species and adopts this chapter in the interest of public health and safety. (Ord. 2004-02 § 1, 2004; Ord. 2004-01 § 1, 2004).

Chapter 17.34
LANDSCAPING
17.34.010 Purpose.
The purpose of this chapter is to protect and enhance Carmel-by-the-Sea’s dominant Monterey Pine urbanized forest and landscaped amenities. It is also the purpose of this chapter to provide for water conservation, and to protect environmentally sensitive habitat areas from degradation by providing for the restoration of native vegetation in and around these areas. (Ord. 2004-02 § 1, 2004; Ord. 2004-01 § 1, 2004).

Chapter 8.44
PERMITS FOR WEARING
CERTAIN SHOES
8.44.010 Purpose.
It is recognized that much of the charm and appeal of the City to residents and visitors alike is due to its urban forest character, featuring the maintenance of Monterey pine, oak and other native trees or shrubs throughout the City. The City has determined to maintain this character which benefits both the residents, by giving them quiet, semiforested neighborhoods in which to live, and the business community, whose prosperity is so closely linked to the attractiveness of the City to visitors. The maintenance of an urban forest throughout the City necessarily involves some informality in the lighting, location and surfacing of street and sidewalk areas, which in turn involves greater risk to those wearing high heeled shoes more adaptable to formal city life. (Ord. 87 C.S. § 1, 1963; Code 1975 § 639.1).

THE CITY’S LAND USE PLAN OF THE LOCAL COASTAL PROGRAM:

It is essential that these and other policy directives be carried out to ensure that the Monterey pine forest landscape is protected so that the forested character of this unique coastal village is preserved. (LUP)

G5-4 Preserve and enhance the City's legacy of an urbanized forest of predominantly Monterey pine, coast live oak and Monterey Cypress. (LUP)

P5-58 Maintain, restore and enhance a predominantly indigenous forest of native Monterey pines and coast live oaks. (LUP)

P5-63 Manage the tree-planting program to achieve an uneven-aged, healthy forest with particular emphasis on native Monterey pines and coast live oaks. (LUP)

P5-80 Plant native Monterey pine seedlings of different genotypes to maximize resistance to diseases and make these seedlings available to the public. (LUP)

THE CITY’S RECOMMENDED TREE SPECIES LIST:

"Monterey pines (Pinus radiata) and cypresses (Cypressus macrocarpa) are the primary upper canopy trees of the forest and the planting of these species shall receive the greatest priority in appropriate situations."

THE USDA FOREST SERVICE:
Given the problems with pitch canker, why plant Monterey pines at all?

In most urban environments, one may opt to avoid any risk of damage from pitch canker by utilizing non-susceptible species as landscape trees. But in a native Monterey pine forest and at the urbanized border of such a forest, planting exotic species will degrade the integrity of a limited natural resource. If Monterey pines that are lost to pitch canker are replaced with non-native tree species, the loss to the native forest will be made permanent. As an alternative, killed trees can be replaced with Monterey Pines that are genetically resistant to pitch canker, thereby helping to sustain this species in its native habitat.

(Source: http://frap.cdf.ca.gov/pitch_canker/research/index.html)

Thursday, April 19, 2007

PART I (of IV): Forest & Beach Commission's Violation of the Municipal Code, Land Use Plan, Recommened Tree Species List & USDA Forest Policy


24” dbh Monterey Pine Tree on City Property
Location: Carpenter St. & 5th Av., S.E. Corner (on 5th Av., right of telephone pole)
Applicants: Sharon And Larry De St. Jeor
Reason for Removal: Resurface Driveway directly west of Monterey Pine Tree

At the 5 April 2007 meeting of the Forest and Beach Commission, there were three applications/public hearings from Carmel-by-the–Sea property owners requesting removal of Monterey Pine trees. The Commission members approved the removal of three Monterey Pine trees and stipulated the planting of Canary Island Pines as replacement trees.

CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA
FOREST AND BEACH COMMISSION


REGULAR MEETING AGENDA
Thursday, April 5, 2007


I. CALL TO ORDER AND ROLL CALL
Peggy Miller, Chairperson
Kathleen Coss (Absent)
Nancy John
Tad Pritchett
Bob Tierney


VI. APPLICATIONS/PUBLIC HEARINGS
Consideration of an application to remove two (20” and 25” dbh) Monterey pine trees due to damage to the retaining walls. The site is located on Dolores 3 NE of 1st. The applicant is Natalie Taggart.

Forest and Beach Commissioners PEGGY MILLER, NANCY JOHN, TAD PRITCHETT AND BOB TIERNEY voted unanimously to approve removal of one of the Monterey Pine trees with the stipulation that it be replaced on the lot by a 3-5 gallon Canary Island Pine.

Consideration of an application to remove one 24’ dbh Monterey pine tree growing on City property to resurface the driveway. The site is located on the SE corner of Carpenter and 5th. The applicants are Sharon and Larry De St. Jeor.

Forest and Beach Commissioners PEGGY MILLER, NANCY JOHN, TAD PRITCHETT AND BOB TIERNEY voted unanimously to approve removal of the Monterey Pine tree with the stipulation that it be replaced on the lot by a 3-5 gallon Canary Island Pine.

Consideration of an application to remove 1-9” dbh cypress tree, 1-48” dbh eucalyptus, 1-323’ dbh eucalyptus and 1-28’ dbh pine tree to enhance safety, vitality and beauty of the Urban Forest, and prune dead and intertwining branches of 4 additional trees. All trees are growing on public property. The site is located on the NE corner of San Antonio and 7th. The applicant is Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Dodson, the applicant is Nancy Porteous-Thomas.

Forest and Beach Commissioners PEGGY MILLER, TAD PRITCHETT AND BOB TIERNEY voted unanimously to approve removal of the 9” cypress, 28” pine and two eucalyptus trees. It was stipulated that two 24” boxed Canary Island Pines and two 23” boxed Coast Live Oaks be planted as replacement trees.


Forest Management Plan
Appendix G


CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA
RECOMMENDED TREE SPECIES LIST


Monterey pines (Pinus radiata) and cypresses (Cypressus macrocarpa) are the primary upper canopy trees of the forest and the planting of these species shall receive the greatest priority in appropriate situations.

Pinus radita – “Monterey Pine
An attractive pine that creates the forested character of our village. A fast growing native species, which naturally occurs along the coast of central California, and can rapidly attain 70-100 feet. It is best suited to coastal landscapes where it becomes drought tolerant. Monterey pine has the form of a pyramid, but at maturity develops a rounded or flatish crown. Accepts lots of water, but can get overgrown and die at early ages, therefore, watering should be limited to the first few years after planting. (Native, evergreen, upper canopy tree).

Pinus canariensis – “Canary Island Pine
Native to the Canary Islands. Is a handsome tree that grows to 60-80 feet tall. Long (9-12inch) blue-green needles. Somewhat gawky appearance as a very young tree changing to a slender pyramid shape, finally developing a round canopy with tiered limbs at maturity. Drought tolerant and resistant to oak root fungus. (Upper canopy tree).

COMMENTS:
While the Forest and Beach Commission is instituting a dramatic policy change by stipulating the planting of non-native, exotic, tropical Canary Island Pines as replacement trees for removed Monterey Pine trees, the Friends of Carmel Forest recently gave away 93 pitch canker resistant Monterey Pine seedlings to individuals willing to plant them. As Friends of Carmel Forest President Clayton Anderson recently wrote, the planting of these seedlings will help “enhance and perpetuate Carmel’s Tree City reputation for many years in the future.”

Wednesday, April 18, 2007

Special Counsel William B. Conners: “what law created a duty on the part of the city”


National Register of Historic Places Flanders Mansion
Mission Trail Nature Preserve
Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA.

Last week, in a formal objection to Judge Robert O’Farrell’s decision in Flanders Foundation vs. City of Carmel by the Sea, et al, Special Counsel William B. Conners wrote on demolition by neglect, as follows:

“There should be factual findings establishing what law created a duty on the part of the city, what that duty entailed, and what appeal or review of that duty exists to protect the city from arbitrary complaints.”

Reference:
Carmel-by-the-Sea
Municipal Code

Chapter 17.32
HISTORIC PRESERVATION

17.32.210 Maintenance and Upkeep.
A. Minimum Maintenance.
1. All resources included in the inventory shall be preserved against decay and deterioration, kept in a state of good repair and free from structural defects. The purpose of this section is to prevent an owner or other person having legal custody and control over a property from facilitating demolition of a historic resource by neglecting it and by permitting damage to it by weather and/or vandalism.

2. Consistent with all other State and City codes requiring that buildings and structures be kept in good repair, the owner or other person having legal custody and control of a property shall repair such building or structure if it is found to have any of the following defects.
a. Building elements so attached that they may fall and injure members of the public or property.

b. Deteriorated or inadequate foundation.

c. Defective or deteriorated flooring.

d. Members of walls, partitions or other vertical supports that split, lean, list or buckle due to defective material or deterioration.

e. Members of ceilings, roofs, ceilings or roof supports or other horizontal members which that sag, split or buckle due to defective materials or deterioration.

f. Fireplaces or chimneys that list, bulge or settle due to defective material or deterioration.

g. Deteriorated, crumbling or loose exterior plaster.

h. Deteriorated or ineffective waterproofing of exterior walls, roofs, foundations or floors, including broken windows or doors.

i. Defective or lack of weather protection for exterior wall coverings, including lack of paint, or weathering due to lack of paint or other protective covering.

j. Any fault, defect or deterioration in the building which that renders it structurally unsafe or not properly watertight.

3. If the Building Official determines that a historic resource or any other property is being neglected and subject to damage from weather or vandalism, the Director and/or Building Official shall meet with the owner or other person having legal custody and control of the historic resource to discuss with them ways to improve the condition of the property. If no attempt or insufficient effort is made to correct any noted conditions thereafter, the Building Official may issue a notice to comply requiring the owner or other person having legal custody and control of the historic resource to take action to require corrections of defects in the subject property in order that such historic resource may be preserved in accordance with this section.

B. Protection of Deteriorated, Vacant and Vandalized Resources.
1. The Building Official shall have the authority to issue an order to comply to any owner of any property included in the inventory if the Building Official determines that the property has become subject to vandalism or constitutes a public nuisance. In such circumstances, the Building Official shall have the authority to issue any order deemed appropriate to keep the property from being further vandalized or from becoming a public nuisance including, but not limited to, ordering that the building be secured and fenced.

2. For the purposes of this provision, the property shall include the interiors and exteriors of any accessory building located on a property in the inventory.

3. Security measures that the Building Official may order shall include, but not be limited to, the following:
a. The installation of the maximum allowed height, under this code, chain-link perimeter fencing with at least one securely locked pedestrian gate and the posting of “No Trespassing” signs at regular intervals.

b. Steel or plywood closures, with one-inch diameter air holes, installed at all doors and windows. (Sandwich panel installation shall be used so as to avoid drilling into window frames and sashes, doors, ornament or masonry units.)

c. The removal of all debris from the premises, including but not limited to wood, paper, cans, bottles and fecal matter.

d. Any temporary modifications required to be made to secure the building shall be reversible.

4. Any plans or proposals for work required to be performed pursuant to an order to comply to secure any building from being further vandalized or from becoming a public nuisance must first be reviewed by the Department and the Building Official to ensure that any work done to secure the building will not damage or alter the historic character of the building. This review by the Department and the Building Official shall be completed within 10 working days from the date any request for review is submitted. If the work to be performed includes substantial alteration, the procedures set forth in this section shall be utilized for review.

5. Nothing herein shall be interpreted to prohibit an owner from taking immediate temporary measures to secure a building from unauthorized entry.

6. It shall be unlawful for any property owner to fail to comply with any order to comply issued by the Building Official under this provision.

7. Additional Remedies – Notice of Intention. In addition to the remedies provided by this code, should an owner fail to comply with an order to comply, the City may take the necessary measures, including those authorized under this code, to immediately secure the property against vandalism or prevent it from becoming a public nuisance. The City shall have the authority to assess the cost of performing this work as a lien against real property on which the building is located and take whatever additional action the City deems necessary to recover its costs and further secure the property and provide for its preservation. Prior to taking these measures, the City shall send a notice of intention to the owner. (Ord. 2004-02 § 1, 2004; Ord. 2004-01 § 1, 2004).

NOTES:
Definitions: The word 'shall' implies a mandatory statement, the word 'should' implies an advisory statement, and the word 'may' implies the right to use discretion. Carmel-by-the-Sea’s Municipal Code contains innumerable uses of the word “shall;” if “shall” in Chapter 17.32 HISTORIC PRESERVATION 17.32.210 Maintenance and Upkeep does not mean “mandatory,” then the entire city municipal code is discretionary.

COMMENT:
Not only is it a sad realization that the mayor and city council members of Carmel-by-the-Sea view the National Register of Historic Places Flanders Mansion as nothing more or less than as a multimillion dollar property to sell into private ownership, but they have instructed Special Counsel William B. Conners to file a formal objection to Judge Robert O’Farrell’s decision, specifically Judge O’Farrell’s ruling that the city is obligated to maintain Flanders Mansion. Simply put, the city fails to comply with the city’s Municipal Code with respect to the maintenance and upkeep of a historic resource, a superior court judge rules the city must maintain the Flanders Mansion, and the city then arrogantly denies it has to obey the city’s own laws.

Tuesday, April 17, 2007

COMMENTARY: The 2007 Annual Meeting of Sunset Cultural Center, Inc.


Carpenter Hall
Sunset Community & Cultural Center
W/s Mission St. between 8th Av. & 10th Av.
Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA.

THEN...nearly 3 years ago, the mayor instigated the formation of Sunset Cultural Center, Inc. (SCC) and expedited the signing of a contract with SCC to manage the Sunset Center for 9 years (2004-2013) without a community consensus of support for nonprofit management of Sunset Center.

AND NOW...SCC Board Members and Executive Director Jack Globenfelt are oblivious to the dearth of community support for SCC as evidenced by only 15% of all tickets purchased by Carmel residents and less than 15 individuals present at the 2007 Annual Meeting.

THEN...in 2004, Sunset Cultural Center, Inc. pledged to reduce the city’s subsidy to SCC for the management of the Sunset Center over time.

AND NOW...at the Annual Meeting, SCC Chairman Perry Walker stated that SCC requires an increased city subsidy in the form of enabling grants to increase utilization of the Sunset Center. This position is contrary to their expectation, as stated on their web site, that by “actively developing new programs and adding to the number of Presenting Partners, SCC intends to increase the number of nights that the theater is used. This effort should reduce Sunset Center’s long-term dependence on City funds.”

THEN...the SCC presented the Sunset Theater under their management as a theater attracting audience members from “the Monterey Bay area, and beyond.”

AND NOW...after nearly 3 years managing the Sunset Center, SCC Board Members and Executive Director Jack Globenfelt realize the Sunset Theater is a Monterey Peninsula theater; of all the tickets purchased, 15% are purchased by Carmel residents, 15% are purchased by Salinas residents and 70% are purchased by others living within a “50 minute drive” of the Sunset Center.

THEN...SCC promised special dispensation to historic user groups to keep historic user groups at the Sunset Center.

AND NOW...SCC Board Members and Executive Director admit the increase in rental rates forced the majority of historic user groups to find other venues for rehearsals and performances.

THEN...SCC anticipated all of the historic user groups would remain at Sunset Center.

AND NOW...as a result of the exodus of historic user groups from the Sunset Center to other venues, SCC reluctantly realized that SCC had to become Presenters, an unanticipated task.

THEN...SCC’s mission was to “unleash the economic potential” of the Sunset Center by “maximizing” the use of the Sunset Center

AND NOW...SCC’s mission has changed from “maximizing” to “optimizing” the use of the Sunset Center.

SCC Chairman Perry Walker stated at the Annual Meeting that they (SCC) wouldn’t be where they are today if it weren’t for the support of the “city council and mayor and city government.” Neither Chairman Perry Walker, nor any SCC Board Member, nor the Executive Director, mentioned the support of Carmelites. Hence, the mayor’s, SCC Board Members’ and Executive Director’s concern is not the community of Carmel-by-the-Sea or Carmelites, rather their sole concern is increased utilization of the Sunset Center, requiring larger and larger city subsidies over time. Needless to say, no data was presented in terms of past utilization rates or future utilization rate goals and the estimated amounts of subsidies anticipated to achieve the utilization rate goals.

Conclusion:
While Sunset Cultural Center, Inc. (SCC) bears responsibility for the management of the Sunset Center, the mayor and city council bear responsibility for all of the city’s assets, including the Scout House, Forest Theatre, Flanders Mansion, et. cetera. And while it is now anticipated that SCC will ask for ever increasing subsidies from the city (taxpayers) over time, the mayor and city council should recognize the current financial imbalance between city financial resources dedicated to the Sunset Center vis-à-vis city financial resources dedicated to the Scout House, Forest Theatre, Flanders Mansion, et. cetera. In recognizing the current egregious financial imbalance, the mayor and city council members should hold the city subsidy to SCC to its current level of $713,000/yr or less for the next contract period (Fiscal Years 2006/07 through 2008/09) and budget significant amounts for long overdo maintenance, rehabilitation, renovation and ADA compliance for the Scout House, Forest Theatre and Flanders Mansion. For the mayor and city council members to do otherwise would be to betray their fundamental responsibility to Carmelites as our elected representatives; and that is, their responsibility to manage ALL of the public’s assets for the benefit of ALL Carmelites!

Addendum:
Sunset Cultural Center, Inc.
Executive Director: Jack Globenfelt
E-mail: jack@sunsetcenter.org
Telephone: (831) 620-2040.

Board of Trustees
Perry Walker, Chairman *
Sarah Brown, Vice-Chair, Personnel *
Jim Price, Building & Grounds *
Katherine Bucquet, PR & Programming
Steven Hillyard, Finance & Building & Grounds
Dee Adolph, Marketing & PR
Michael McMahan, Treasure, Finance * (Absent at 2007 Annual Meeting)
Karen Kadushin, Finance and Governance * (Absent at 2007 Annual Meeting)

Trustees with an asterisk (*) have served since July 1, 2004; each Trustee serves a maximum of two, three-year terms. 1/3 of the Trustees shall be Carmel-by-the-Sea residents and1/3 shall be Monterey County residents.

City Council
Sue McCloud, Mayor (Present at 2007 Annual Meeting)
P.O. Box M-1, Carmel 93921
Phone: 624-7310
E-mail: smccloud@ci.carmel.ca.us

Mike Cunningham (Absent at 2007 Annual Meeting)
2900 Franciscan Way, Carmel 93923
Phone: 626-8845
E-mail: mjc1820@msn.com

Paula Hazdovac (Absent at 2007 Annual Meeting)
P.O. Box 3164, Carmel 93921
Phone: 625-2480
E-mail: pjhaz@hotmail.com

Gerard A. Rose (Absent at 2007 Annual Meeting)
P.O. Box 6516, Carmel 93921
Phone: 625-1124 (Home) 624-3228 (Office)
E-mail: gfitzrose@aol.com

Ken Talmage (Absent at 2007 Annual Meeting)
P.O. Box 1526, Carmel 93921
Phone 624-2462
E-mail KKTalm@aol.com

Wednesday, April 11, 2007

Planning Commission 11 April 2007 Meeting: Annexation, Re-Zoning & Proposed Negative Declaration for Carmel Convalescent Hospital Property


Carmel-by-the-Sea City Hall
City Hall Council Chambers
E/s Monte Verde St. between Ocean Av. & 7th Av.
Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA.
Note: Wednesday, April 11, 2007, the Planning Commission's Tour of Inspection begins at 3:30 P.M.; Public Hearing begins at approximately 4:30 P.M.

UPDATE: Carmel-by-the-Sea Planning Commissioners Alan Hewer, Steve Hillyard and Robin Wilson (Chairman Bill Strid and Karen Sharp absent) unanimously voted to recommend denial of developer Robert Leidig’s request to annex the Carmel Convalescent Hospital property Wednesday evening. During the public hearing, individuals spoke as individuals and individuals representing the Carmel Residents Association, Carmel Woods Association and the Save Our Neighborhood Coalition spoke for their respective groups; approximately 30 individuals spoke of a total of approximately 80 people present in City Hall Chambers. They expressed their opposition to annexation, R-2 re-zoning designation and support for an Environmental Impact Report (EIR). After a brief discussion, the Planning Commissioners voted 3-0 to deny annexation; procedurally, it was then unnecessary to consider re-zoning or the requirement for an EIR. The Planning Commission’s recommendation is scheduled to be heard by the City Council at their upcoming meeting on Tuesday, 1 May 2007.
(Reference: BIG SETBACK FOR HOSPITAL ANNEXATION, Mary Brownfield, The Carmel Pine Cone, April 13, 2007, pages 1A and 9A, http://www.carmelpinecone.com/)

SYNOPSIS:
With an option to purchase the Carmel Convalescent Hospital property (3.7 acres bounded by Valley Way and Highway One) from Rigoulette, LLC, a Pebble Beach based company, developer Robert Leidig has requested the Carmel Convalescent Hospital Property be annexed to the City of Carmel-by-the-Sea and rezoned to high-density R-4 zoning designation. Leidig envisions about 6 affordable units selling for $150,000 or $300,000, clusters of 2,000 sq. ft. units selling for $1.5 million each for a total of 45 condos, underground parking, a community center, and courtyards. During the public comment period for the environmental study of Leidig’s application, Carmel residents submitted “a stack of comments an inch thick, all of them in vehement opposition.”

For a complete article, from Monterey County Weekly, copy, paste and click,
http://www.montereycountyweekly.com/news/.
Leidig’s Bid: CARMEL DEVELOPER WANTS TO ANNEX, REZONE OLD HOSPITAL SITE, Kera Abraham, APRIL 5, 2007.

NOTE: At the end of the article, Planning Services Manager Brian Roseth stated,
“The first thing we need to establish is: Do we have the public service capability [for the project]? Would it have significant impact on the neighborhood? If we can’t answer those questions, then we shouldn’t annex the property.”


CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA
PLANNING COMMISSION
AGENDA
Regular Meeting
April 11, 2007


Commissioners:
Alan Hewer
Steven Hillyard
Karen Sharp
Robin Wilson
Bill Strid, Chairman

PUBLIC HEARING

ZC 06-1
Robert Leidig
Valley Way & Highway 1
APN: 009-061-002, 003, 005

Considerations of recommendations to the City Council on annexation and pre-zoning requests for a property of approximately 3.7 acres located on the north side of Valley Way, about 100 feet east of Monterey Street. The Planning Commission will consider the applicant’s request to pre-zone the property to an R-4 classification, and may review other zoning options. The Planning Commission also will review an environmental Initial Study and proposed Negative Declaration. The Planning Commission will forward all recommendations to the City Council for action.


INFORMATION ABOUT ENVIRONMENTAL PROCESS

APPENDIX G
Environmental Checklist Form


ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS POTENTIALLY AFFECTED:
The environmental factors checked below would be potentially affected by this project, involving at least one impact that is a "Potentially Significant Impact" as indicated by the checklist on the following pages.

Includes:
Air Quality, Hydrology and Water Quality, Land Use/Planning, Noise, Population/Housing, Public Services, Transportation/Traffic, Utilities and Service Systems and Mandatory Findings of Significance.

One of 5 Determinations based on the initial evaluation is the following:
“I find that the proposed project MAY have a significant effect on the environment, and an ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT is required.”

At the end of the document, there are questions concerning each issue, including:
III. AIR QUALITY

VIII. HYDROLOGY AND WATER QUALITY

IX. LAND USE AND PLANNING

XI. NOISE

XII. POPULATION AND HOUSING

XIII. PUBLIC SERVICES

XV. TRANSPORTATION/TRAFFIC

XVI. UTILITIES AND SERVICE SYSTEMS

XVII. MANDATORY FINDINGS OF SIGNIFICANCE

Reference: http://www.califaep.org/envcheck.doc
For Checklist, click on post title above.


ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
For California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines, copy, paste and click
http://www.ceres.ca.gov/topic/env_law/ceqa/guidelines/

For Article 7. EIR Process, copy, paste and click
http://www.ceres.ca.gov/topic/env_law/ceqa/guidelines/art7.html

Saturday, April 07, 2007

Carmel Art Association Presents 'OBSERVATIONS' BY ARTISTS WAGSTAFF, JOHNSON, ST. MARY & ARTWORKS BY FARINA, MEHEEN, TAKIGAWA


Carmel Art Association
W/s Dolores St. between 5th Av. & 6th Av.
Carmel-by-the-Sea, CA.

Carmel Art Association Presents a Three-Person Show Featuring Artwork by Jan Wagstaff, Barbara Johnson and Michael St. Mary; and artwork by Mark Farina, Alicia Meheen and Pamela Takigawa.

Carmel Art Association
Voted “Art Gallery of the Year” by the Carmel Business Association
W/s Dolores St. between 5th Av. & 6th Av.
10:00 A.M. – 5:00 P.M., Daily, Open to the Public at No Charge

“Founded in 1927, Carmel's oldest gallery features the work of more than 120 professional local artists, and is dedicated to presenting only the finest work for sale by artists living on the Monterey Peninsula.”

For more information, click on the post title above (http://www.carmelart.org/) or (831) 624-6176.

‘Observations:’ Three-Person Show Featuring Artwork by Jan Wagstaff, Barbara Johnson and Michael St. Mary & Artwork by Mark Farina, Alicia Meheen and Pamela Takigawa

Thursday, 5 April 2007 – Tuesday, 1 May 2007

GROUP SHOW:
‘Observations:’ Beardsley Room
Jan Wagstaff will feature new oil paintings inspired by New Zealand's lush foilage.
For painter Jan Wagstaff’s Education, Employment, Professional and Community Acitivities, Selected Solo Exhibitions, Selected Group Exhibitions, Awards and Selected Public and Private Collections, and paintings, click on post title above, click on “calendar,” then click on “Jan Wagstaff.”

Barbara Johnson will present abstract oil paintings.
For painter and printmaker Barbara Johnson’s memberships, education and selected collections, click on post title above, click on “calendar,” then click on “Barbara Johnson.”

Michael St. Mary presents abstract geometric forms in wood and stone derived from forms found in nature.
For sculptor Michael St. Mary’s biography, education and selected sculpture, click on post title above, click on “artists,” “click here for page 2,” then “lick here for page 3,” then click on “Michael St. Mary.”

Opening reception Saturday, April 7, 6:00 – 8:00 P.M.

GALLERY SHOWCASE:
Featuring Artwork by Mark Farina, Alicia Meheen and Pamela Takigawa: Segal Room

Mark Farina features fresh landscapes and still life subjects in watercolor.
For painter Mark Farina’s biography, education and selected paintings, click on post title above, click on “calendar,” then click on “Mark Farina.”

Alica Meheen will present new watercolors and oils of regional landscapes.
For painter Alica Meheen’s artists statement, biography and selected paintings, click on post title above, click on "calendar," then click on “Alica Meheen.”

Pamela Takigawa will feature dramatic monoprints of owls and other birds.

Opening reception Saturday, April 7, 6:00 – 8:00 P.M.

Thursday, April 05, 2007

City's Bank Payments, Materials/Supplies, Employee Medical & Workman's Compensation Insurance, Utilities & Communications for February 2007

Check Expenditures by Category for February 2007:

From the City’s Check Register for February 2007, the following categories, vendors, amounts, account names, totals and percentages of total check amounts are listed.

VENDOR NAME---------AMOUNT-----------ACCOUNT NAME

BANK PAYMENTS:
WESTAMERICA BANK $14,772.40 FIRE ENGINE PUMPER – LEASE PAYMENT

WESTAMERICA BANK $19,497.04 POLICE SOFTWARE - LEASE PAYMENT

WESTAMERICA BANK $32,065.02 PRINCIPAL PAYMENT - RIO PARK LOAN
WESTAMERICA BANK $4,452.73 INTEREST PAYMENT - RIO PARK LOAN

WESTAMERICA BANK $56,000.00 PRINCIPAL PAYMENT - RIO PARK//VISTA LOBOS LOAN
WESTAMERICA BANK $1,960.00 INTEREST PAYMENT - RIO PARK//VISTA LOBOS LOAN

TOTAL: $128,747.19 (29% of total check amounts)
223 Checks Total: $449,219.83

MATERIAL/SUPPLIES, ET CETERA
AIR EXCHANGE, INC. $515.70 FIRE EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES

BENAVENTE BSNS MACHINES OFFICE MACHINE SUPPLIES $563.85

BOB LYNCH FORD, INC. $36,684.71 PURCHASE OF 2006 FORD MASON'S TRUCK

BOUND TREE MEDICAL LLC $111.33 MEDICAL SUPPLIES

BRINTON'S $7.70 MATERIAL/SUPPLIES

CA COMMERCIAL INTERIORS $619.47 ERGONOMIC CHAIR FOR POLICE DEPT DISPATCH

CARMEL VACUUM & APPLIANCE $395.75 TOOLS/EQUIPMENT

CDW-G GOVERNMENT INC. MATERIALS/SUPPLIES $1,216.97

CENTRAL WHOLESALE ELEC. D MATERIAL/SUPPLIES & OCEAN AVE MEDIAN PROJECT ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES $2,388.82

DOCUMENT PROC SYSTEMS $344.00 OFFICE MACHINE SUPPLIES

DROUGHT RESISTANT NURSERY MATERIAL/SUPPLIES $868.62

ELECTRICAL DIST. COMPANY MATERIAL/SUPPLIES $217.21

FERGUSON ENTERPRISES,INC. MATERIAL/SUPPLIES $1,254.11

FLINT TRADING, INC. $1,144.03 MATERIALS/SUPPLIES

FORESTRY SUPPLIERS INC. $120.57 MATERIALS/SUPPLIES

GRAINGER PARTS OPERATIONS $169.40 MATERIAL/SUPPLIES

GRANITE ROCK COMPANY $341.27 MATERIALS/SUPPLIES
GRANITE ROCK COMPANY $52.98 MATERIAL/SUPPLIES
GRANITE ROCK COMPANY $320.66 MATERIALS/SUPPLIES

HOME DEPOT/GECF MATERIAL/SUPPLIES& TOOLS/EQUIPMENT $1,175.13

KNAPP MILL & CABINET CO. MATERIALS/SUPPLIES $339.19

MCSHANE'S NURSERY & LANDS $185.26 MATERIAL/SUPPLIES

M.J.MURPHY $60.83 MATERIALS/SUPPLIES

MONTEREY TIRE SERVICE $37.36 TIRES/TUBES

MUNICIPAL MAINT EQUIP,INC $29.12 AUTOMOTIVE PARTS/SUPPLIES

OFFICE DEPOT, INC. OFFICE SUPPLIES $480.88

ORCHARD SUPPLY HARDWARE MATERIAL/SUPPLIES $990.69

PROFORCE LAW ENFORCEMENT $2,155.40 TASER CAM RECORDERS FOR POLICE DEPT

SUMMIT UNIFORMS CLOTHING EXPENSE & SAFETY EQUIPMENT $5,520.82

TORO PETROLEUM $27,625.27 FUEL

TOTAL FILTRTN SPECIALISTS $492.55 MATERIAL/SUPPLIES

UNITED RENT HWY TECH INC. $130.25 MATERIALS/SUPPLIES

VALLEY AUTO SUPPLY AUTOMOTIVE PARTS/SUPPLIES & TOOLS/EQUIPMENT $140.78

WELLS FARGO (CREDIT CARD) $93.79 OFFICE SUPPLIES
WELLS FARGO (CREDIT CARD) $186.84 MATERIALS/SUPPLIES

WINNERS AWARDS & ENGRAVER $32.18 OFFICE SUPPLIES

TOTAL: $87,013.49 (19% of total check amounts)
223 Checks Total: $449,219.83

EMPLOYEE MEDICAL & WORKER’S COMPENSATION INSURANCE:
AFLAC MEDICAL PROGRAM $115.00

CITY OF CARMEL WORKERS COMPENSATION INSURANCE $3,069.05

COASTAL HEALTHCARE MEDICAL PROGRAM $6,386.60

LIU OF NA RETIREMENT $5,662.26

NANCY TITUS $2,000.00 WORKERS COMPENSATION INSURANCE

TRISTAR RISK MANAGEMENT WORKERS COMPENSATION INSURANCE $2,609.00

TOTAL: $19,841.91 (4% of total check amounts)
223 Checks Total: $449,219.83

UTILITIES:
CAL-AM WATER COMPANY UTILITIES $130.31

PACIFIC GAS & ELECTRIC CO UTILITIES $9,146.61

TOTAL: $ 9,276.92 (2% of total check amounts)
223 Checks Total: $449,219.83

COMMUNICATIONS:
AT&T $2,905.04

NEXTEL COMMUNICATIONS TELEPHONE $2,097.28

VERIZON WIRELESS $354.17 TELEPHONE

TOTAL: $ 5,356.49 (1% of total check amounts)
223 Checks Total: $449,219.83

FEBRUARY 2007 SUMMARY:

Contractual Services/Outside Labor: $180,048.67 (40% of total check amounts)
Bank Payments: $128,747.19 (29% of total check amounts)
Materials/Supplies: $87,013.49 (19% of total check amounts)
Employee Medical & Workman’s Compensation Insurance: $19,841.91 (4% of total check amounts)
Utilities: $ 9,276.92 (2% of total check amounts)
Communications: $ 5,356.49 (1% of total check amounts)

223 Checks Total: $449,219.83

FY 2006/07 GENERAL FUND TOTAL: $ 11,649,860
Salaries/Benefits: $ 7,074,381
Materials/Supplies: $ 4,575,479

(Source: Carmel-by-the-Sea, February 2007 Check Register, March 13, 2007 Meeting Agenda Packet, http://www.ci.carmel.ca.us/)

Wednesday, April 04, 2007

City’s Contractual Services/Outside Labor for February 2007

As an example, the following is an alphabetical listing of vendors hired by the city for contractual services/outside labor for the month of February 2007. Some of the contracts/agreements with these vendors appeared as resolutions on city council public agendas (labeled *); most of the contractual services/outside labor items did not appear on public agendas.

VENDOR NAME--------------AMOUNT------------ACCOUNT NAME

ADVANCED WASTE SOLUTIONS $39.95 DOCUMENT DESTRUCTION SVC

AILING HOUSE PEST CONTROL CONTRACTUAL SERVICES $323.00

* ANDA-BURGHARDT ADVRTISING MARKETING EXPENSES $22,420.44

ANDON LAUNDRY SERVICE $96.65 CONTRACTUAL SERVICES

ARNOLD HEATING & SHEETMET $2,600.00 OUTSIDE LABOR

ASSURED LANDSCAPE $6,018.50 OUTSIDE LABOR

BEST DOORS INC. $162.00 OUTSIDE LABOR

BROADWAY LOCKSMITH $258.57 OUTSIDE LABOR

CARMEL CHEVRON $60.00 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE

* CARMEL FIRE PROTCTN ASSOC PLAN CHECK (CONTRACT FIRE EXP) $1,625.00

CIRCA: HISTORIC PROPTY DEV $557.50

CITY OF MONTEREY VEHICLE MAINTENANCE SERVICES $1,916.49

CITY OF SEASIDE $853.51 STORM DRAIN CLEANING

COASTLINE BUSINESS FORMS $189.91 PRINTING

CODE PUBLISHING COMPANY $137.00 CONTRACTUAL SERVICES

COPIES BY-THE-SEA PRINTING $497.33

COPY KING $273.49 PRINTING

CORBIN WILLITS SYSTEM $546.66 CONTRACTUAL SERVICES

* CRAVEN LANDSCAPING INC. $45,860.65 HML GARDEN CLUB LANDSCAPE PROJECT

DAVE'S REPAIR SERVICE CONTRACTUAL SERVICES $332.33

* DEWEY D. EVANS $200.00 CITY TREASURER SERVICES

* E.OSTERKAMP APPRAISALS $5,000.00 INVENTORY/APPRAISALS OF ART COLLECTION

ERIC MILLER ARCHITECTS $1,763.75 VOLUME STUDIES

FEDEX $26.60 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE

GIANNA ROCHA $500.00 PART-TIME ASSISTANCE

GRANITE ROCK COMPANY $137.07 FOREST HILL PARK IMPROVEMENTS

* HALL LANDSCAPE DESIGN $144.00 PROFESSIONAL SVCS FOR 4TH AVE RIPARIAN PROJ

HAYWARD LUMBER $133.21 LIGHT FIXTURE REPAIR

HINDERLITER, DE LLAMAS SALES TAX COLLECTIONS SERVICES $2,145.79

IKON OFFICE SOLUTIONS CONTRACTUAL SERVICES $386.73

IVERSON TREE SERVICE $1,100.00 OUTSIDE LABOR

* JAN ROEHL $1,312.50 GRANT WRITING SERVICES

JOHN LEY'S TREE SERVICE OUTSIDE LABOR $4,780.00

J. W. MARSHALL $42.50 COMPUTER CONSULTANT SERVICES

KENT L. SEAVEY $250.00 HISTORIC STUDIES

LARRY MENKE INC $744.12 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE

MARINA BACKFLOW COMPANY $326.95 OUTSIDE LABOR

MISSION UNIFORM SERVICE CONTRACTUAL SERVICES & CLOTHING EXPENSE $1,034.42

MONTEREY COUNTY BUSINESS $244.80 CONTRACTUAL SERVICES

MONTEREY COUNTY HERALD ADVERTISING $3,597.13

MONTEREY COUNTY OFFICE ED $7,290.00 PEG ACCESS CONTRACT OCT - DEC 2006

MONTEREY POLICE DEPT $1,793.09 BOOKING FEES OCT - DEC 2006

MORRILL & FORBES $220.00 CHIMNEY CLEANING

NEILL ENGINEERS CORP. UPDATE CITY MAPS PROFESSIONAL SERVICES $4,150.00

NEW IMAGE LANDSCAPE CO. $2,937.50 CONTRACTUAL SERVICES

NICHOLS PLUMBING/HEATING $1,599.04 OUTSIDE LABOR

PENINSUL HYDRONICS INC. $184.66 OUTSIDE LABOR

* PENINSULA MESSENGER SERV $4,140.00 MAIL SERVICE CONTRACT

PROPERTY SERV/MAINTENANCE $625.00 CONTRACTUAL SERVICES

RANCHO CAR WASH $19.46 OUTSIDE LABOR

REDSHIFT $99.95 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE

RICHARD PETTY ELECTRIC $147.00 OUTSIDE LABOR

ROBERT LITTELL ARCHITECT $765.00 VOLUME STUDIES

ROTO-ROOTER $125.00 OUTSIDE LABOR

RYAN RANCH PRINTERS $727.16 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

SAN JOSE CONSTRUCTION INC $5,300.00 DRIVEWAY REPAIRS - OCEAN & 6TH

SENTRY ALARM SYSTEMS $125.00 OUTSIDE LABOR

SPENCERS TREE SERVICE $1,500.00 OUTSIDE LABOR

STOWE CONTRACTING INC. $1,116.10 SIDEWALK REPAIR

THE CARMEL PINE CONE ADVERTISING $449.83

THERAN MILLS $80.00 OUTSIDE LABOR

VALLEY LANDSCAPING & PAVING $8,000.00 SIDEWALK REPAIR

VAPOR CLEANERS INC OUTSIDE LABOR $18.45

VASILOVICH $85.00 VOLUME STUDIES

* W PAUL WOOD $3,258.50 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

WASSON'S CLEANING SVCS. $1,000.23 POLICE DEPT CLEANING SERVICES

WELLS FARGO (CREDIT CARD) $75.00 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE

WEST COAST ARBORISTS INC $15,120.00 TREE GRID PRUNING

WESTER VW-DODGE $212.24 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE

WILLIAM B. CONNERS $12,040.00 LEGAL SERVICES-FLANDERS LAWSUIT

* Contractual Services/Outside Labor which appeared on city council public agendas as resolutions

TOTAL: $ 181,841.76 (40% of total check amounts)

223 Checks Total: $449,219.83

FY 2006/07 GENERAL FUND TOTAL: $ 11,649,860
Salaries/Benefits: $ 7,074,381
Materials/Supplies: $ 4,575,479

(Source: Carmel-by-the-Sea
February 2007 Check Register, March 13, 2007 Meeting Agenda Packet,
http://www.ci.carmel.ca.us/)

Tuesday, April 03, 2007

City Consultants Per Resolutions (FY 2005/06 & FY 2006/07)

AMENDED: Includes Sunset Cultural Center, Inc.
FISCAL YEAR 2006/07
July 1, 2006
Per Special Meeting
June 8, 2004
CONSIDERATION OF RESOLUTION NO. 2004-47 ENTERING INTO AN AGREEMENT WITH SUNSET CULTURAL CENTER, INC. FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATION OF SUNSET CENTER.
Sunset Center Complex
Operating Budget (SCC, Inc.)
FY 2006/07 $ 713,000

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, August 8, 2006

Consideration of a Resolution authorizing the establishment of a cooperative purchasing agreement for a grid pruning project and award the contract for the project to West Coast Arborists, Inc. in an amount not to exceed $40,000

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Consideration of a Resolution of the City Council entering into an agreement with Jan Roehl, Ph.D. to provide grant writing services.

Consideration of a Resolution agreeing to a payment of $125,000 to the Pebble Beach Company for legal costs associated with the Areas of Special Biological Significance Cease and Desist Order and approving a payment schedule.

Consideration of a Resolution entering into an agreement with the Monterey County Convention and Visitors Bureau (MCCVB) for marketing services in an amount not to exceed $108,376 for Fiscal Year 2006-07.

Consideration of a Resolution authorizing the execution of a 3-year agreement with Dewey D. Evans to provide services as the City Treasurer.
Treasurer $ 2,584 FY 2006/07 Budget

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, November 7, 2006

Consideration of a Resolution awarding a contract to Craven Landscaping in the amount not to exceed $136,187.50 for the landscape renovation at the Harrison Memorial Library.
City Funds: $136,187.50 (Garden Club donation to Deposit Acct # 50-24050-0640)
Grant Funds: None.

Note: The Garden Club, from donations, is expected to cover most of the cost of the Harrison Memorial Library landscape renovation project by Craven Landscaping; the City will cover any shortfall.

Consideration of a Resolution entering into an agreement with Ralph Andersen & Associates for the preparation of a City Library operations study.
City Funds: $14,000

Consideration of a Resolution approving expenditures for the Ocean Avenue Landscape Project in an amount not to exceed $17,650.
City Funds: $17,650 (funded by Ocean Avenue Landscape Project donations)

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, December 5, 2006

Consideration of a Resolution authorizing the City Administrator to enter into a Consultant Services Agreement with the firm of Eric Miller, Architects, to provide cubic volume compliance determinations for projects located in the single-family residential (R-1) district.

Consideration of a Resolution authorizing Robert S. Jacques as Program Manager for the City’s Regional Storm Water Management Program in an amount not to exceed $7,820.

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, January 9, 2007

Consideration of a Resolution authorizing the City Administrator to execute a Consultant Services Agreement with the firm of RBF Consulting in an amount not to exceed $166,488 for the General Plan Update project.

Consideration of a Resolution authorizing the City Administrator to execute a Consultant Services Agreement with the firm of Architectural Resources Group for preparation of an update to the City’s Historic Context Statement in an amount not-to-exceed $63,000.

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, February 6, 2007

Consideration of a resolution awarding a contract to George Di Peso Landscape in the amount of $155,851, authorizing a 10% contingency of $15,585, and authorizing a transfer of $171,436 from the capital improvement reserve account for construction of the San Carlos St. and Carpenter Hall elements in Phase II of the Sunset Center Landscaping Project.
City Funds: None
Grant Funds: $171,436 ($231,048 grant amount)

Consideration of Resolution entering into a contract with anda/burghardt in an amount not to exceed $32,000 to design, produce and maintain the City of Carmel-by-the-Sea web site at domain ci.carmel.ca.us.

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, March 13, 2007

Consideration of a Resolution entering into an agreement with Nichols Consulting Engineers for a 2007 Pavement Management and Truck Impact Fee study in an amount not to exceed $60,300. AMENDED TO $42,000

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, April 3, 2007

Consideration of a Resolution entering into an agreement with the City of Pacific Grove for Fire Administrative services in an amount not-to-exceed $20,000.

TOTAL: $621,268.00 July 2006 – April 2007
AMENDED TOTAL: $1,334,268.00

TOTAL BUDGET FY 2006/07: $ 11,649,860

FISCAL YEAR 2005/06
July 1, 2005
Per Special Meeting
June 8, 2004
CONSIDERATION OF RESOLUTION NO. 2004-47 ENTERING INTO AN AGREEMENT WITH SUNSET CULTURAL CENTER, INC. FOR THE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATION OF SUNSET CENTER.
Sunset Center Complex
Operating Budget (SCC, Inc.)
FY 2005/06 772,000

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, July 5, 2005

Approval of Agreement with Bellinger Foster Steinmentz Landscape Architecture for Sunset Center Landscape II/Landscape Architectural Additional Services.
City Funds: $11,000
Grant Funds: Phase II grants may recover City costs.

Adopting a Resolution Entering into an Agreement with Hall Landscape Design for Preparation of a Preliminary Design for the Fourth Avenue Riparian Habitat Restoration Project.
City Funds: $25,000
Grant Funds: $373,000 grant/$74,600 City match

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, August 2, 2005

Consideration of Funding in an Amount Not to Exceed $29,835 for a Contract Amendment with the Firm of Denise Duffy & Associates for Completion of the Final EIR for the Flanders Mansion Project.

Note:
$ 73,954 (FY 2004/05)
$ 43,406 (FY 2005/06) Flanders Studies
TOTAL: $117,360

Consideration of a Resolution for Award of Contract for Fire and Burglar Alarm Monitoring of City-owned facilities to Sentry Alarm.
109302 11/1/05 SENTRY ALARM SYSTEMS $1,268.16 01 64053 CONTRACTUAL SERVICES
109302 11/1/05 SENTRY ALARM SYSTEMS $600.00 01 65053 CONTRACTUAL SERVICES
109302 11/1/05 SENTRY ALARM SYSTEMS $675.15 01 70050 OUTSIDE LABOR
109302 11/1/05 SENTRY ALARM SYSTEMS $423.00 01 76053 CONTRACTUAL SERVICES
109336 11/8/05 SENTRY ALARM SYSTEMS $5,967.00 01 72053 CONTRACTUAL SERVICES
----Vendor Total---- $8,933.31

Adopting a Resolution to Award a Bid for Restroom Cleaning of Public Facilities to Professional Property Maintenance in an amount not to exceed $72,999.52.

Consideration of a Resolution Authorizing the Establishment of a Cooperative Purchasing Agreement for the Grid Pruning of Urban Forest Trees and Award the Contract to West Coast Arborists, Inc. in an Amount Not to Exceed $35,000.

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, September 6, 2005

Consideration Of Resolution To Award A Contract To Iverson Tree Service In The Amount Of $33,050 For The Removal Of Dead Trees And Stumps.

Consideration Of Resolution To Award A Contract To Pavex Construction Company To Reconstruct The Beach Bluff Pathway Between Eighth Avenue And Martin Way In An Amount Not-To-Exceed $157,475.

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, October 4, 2005

Awarding A Professional Services Agreement For Financial Statement Auditing Services To Nicholson & Olson, LLP For Fiscal Years 2004-05, 2005-06 And 2006-07, In An Amount Not To Exceed $63,000 Over The Course Of The Three Fiscal Years.

Consideration Of A Resolution To Renew Joint Contract With The City Of Pacific Grove For Administrative Services For Fire Services For An Additional Amount Not To Exceed $70,000.

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, November 1, 2005

Consideration of a Resolution authorizing the amendment of an agreement with Paul Wood, CPA, to provide financial consulting services.
City Funds: $50,000 annually

Consideration of entering into an agreement with Graham and Associates for destination marketing services in an amount not to exceed $100,000.

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, January 10, 2006

Consideration of a Resolution awarding the bid and contract for the Fire Station Seismic Retro-fit/Remodel Project. (under separate cover)

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, February 7, 2006

Consideration of a Resolution to authorize the transfer of $493,907 from the Capital Improvement Reserve Fund to the General Fund for the Fire Station Seismic Retrofit and Remodel Project
Overall Cost: $493,907 (including 15% contingency)

Consideration of a Resolution authorizing the City Administrator to enter into a consulting agreement with Sellers & Associates for the position of Economic Development Manager. (under separate cover)
110181 3/21/06 SELLERS ASSOCIATES $ 5,625.00 01 64051 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CONTRACTUAL SERVICES
110322 4/11/06 SELLERS ASSOCIATES 4,500.00 01 64051 PROF SVCS-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
110504 5/9/06 SELLERS ASSOCIATES 4,500.00 01 64051 PROF SVCS-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
110744 6/13/06 SELLERS ASSOCIATES 4,500.00 01 64051 PROF SVCS-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
111197 8/15/06 SELLERS ASSOCIATES $ 3,500.00 01 85300 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMT CONSULTANT
111399 9/12/2006 SELLERS ASSOCIATES 3,500.00 01 85300 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMT CONSULTANT
111591 10/10/06 SELLERS ASSOCIATES $ 3,858.39 01 85300 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMT CONSULTANT
112079 12/22/06 SELLERS ASSOCIATES $ 3,967.00 01 85300 FINAL PAYMENT-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMT CONSULTANT
Total: $ 33,950.39 (July & November Check Registers Not Available)

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, March 7, 2006

Consideration of a Resolution authorizing a contract with Peninsula Messenger Service to provide mail delivery services.
City Funds: $50,000 (annual maximum)

Special Meeting
Tuesday, May 23, 2006

Consideration of a Resolution entering into a professional services agreement with Ellen Osterkamp for art inventory and art appraisal services in an amount not to exceed $90,000.

Regular Meeting
Tuesday, June 6, 2006

Consideration of a Resolution authorizing Carmel-by-the-Sea to jointly participate in a fire department consolidation feasibility analysis.
City Funds: $7,529.08
Grant Funds: $ -0-

Special Meeting
Tuesday, June 13, 2006

Consideration of a Resolution entering into a professional services Agreement with Anda/Burghardt Advertising for destination marketing services in an amount not to exceed $100,000 for Fiscal Year 2006-07.

Council Member ROSE moved to support, on condition of a report provided to Council before its June 22 meeting, membership in the MCCVB ($108,376 for FY2006-07), seconded by Council Member HAZDOVAC and carried unanimously by consensus.

Special Meeting
Thursday, June 22, 2006

Consideration of a Resolution entering into a professional services Agreement with Aurum Consulting Engineers Monterey Bay, Inc. for Electrical and Lighting Design of the Ocean Avenue Median Renovation Project.
City Funds: $6,300
Grant Funds: Donated Funds

TOTAL: $1,553,626.30
AMENDED TOTAL: $2,325,626.30
TOTAL BUDGET FY 2005/06: $11,931,765


(Sources: CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA, FISCAL YEAR 2006/07 THROUGH 2008/09 TRIENNIAL DRAFT BUDGET; City of Carmel-by-the-Sea Agendas and Minutes, http://www.ci.carmel.ca.us/)

Sunday, April 01, 2007

BREAKING HEADLINE NEWS!

Late Friday, 30 March 2007, the City Council of Carmel-by-the-Sea met for a Special Meeting at City Hall at 4:30 P.M.

City Administrator Rich Guillen presented a capital improvement triennial budget for fiscal years 2007/08 through 2009/10. Highlights included the following:

Capital Improvements (2007/08)
Additions:
Scout House (Design Work, Phase I): $200,000
Forest Theatre (Phase I): $500,000
Flanders Mansion (Maintenance per Municipal Code, Judge’s Ruling, Phase I): $500,000
Streets, Roads & Avenues (Phase I): $100,000
Subtotal: $1,300,000

Proposed Pre-existing:
4th Avenue Riparian Restoration $89,321
Parking lot-Sunset Center $50,000
Tennis Court Reconstruction $40,000
Repave Mission between 3rd & 4th $150,000
City Hall Carpeting (Admin area) $15,000
Subtotal $344,321

TOTAL: $1,644,321
Note: To be financed from the General Fund (1/4 of total equal to $411,080.25), Unreserved/Undesignated Fund Balance of $3,053,341 (1/2 of total equal to $822,160.50) and Capital Improvement Reserve Fund of $1,186,872 (1/4 of total equal to $411,080.25).

Note:
Estimated balance at June 30, 2006 $550,599
(Source: City Council, Agenda Item Summary, Prepared by Joyce Giuffre, February 7, 2006)
Transfer of the fiscal year 2005-06 General Fund surplus of $636,273 to the Capital Improvement Reserve Fund.
Total Capital Improvement Reserve Fund: $1,186,872

Ending Balances:
Capital Improvement Reserve Fund: $775,791.75
Unreserved/Undesignated Fund Balance: $2,231,180.50

Capital Improvements (2008/09)
Additions:
Scout House (Phase II ADA Compliance, Completion): $300,000
Forest Theatre (Phase II): $500,000
Flanders Mansion (Maintenance per Municipal Code, Phase II): $500,000
Streets, Roads & Avenues (Phase II): $200,000
Subtotal: $1,500,000

Proposed Pre-existing:
Parking lot-Del Mar $159,000
Underground Water Tank/Booster Pump $100,000
Pedestrian Path - S. Antonio bet 2nd & 4th $60,000
City Hall Carpeting (Bldg/Planning area) $25,000
Scout House ADA Upgrades (design work) $50,000 (Omit due to completion in FY 2007/08)
Subtotal $344,000

TOTAL: $1,844,000
Note: To be financed from the General Fund (1/4 of total equal to $461,000), Unreserved/Undesignated Fund Balance (1/2 of total equal to $922,000) and Capital Improvement Reserve Fund (1/4 of total equal to $461,000)

Ending Balances:
Capital Improvement Reserve Fund: $314,791.75
Unreserved/Undesignated Fund Balance: $1,309,180.50

Capital Improvements (2009/10)
Scout House (Annual Maintenance): $50,000
Forest Theatre (Phase III): $500,000
Flanders Mansion (Improvements, Phase III): $500,000
Streets, Roads & Avenues (Annual Maintenance): $100,000
Subtotal: $1,150,000

Note: To be financed from the General Fund (1/4 of total equal to $287,500), Unreserved/Undesignated Fund Balance (1/2 of total equal to $575,000)and Capital Improvement Reserve Fund (1/4 of total equal to $287,500).

Ending Balances:
Capital Improvement Reserve Fund: $27,291.75
Unreserved/Undesignated Fund Balance: $734,180.50

NOTES: Assuming no surpluses or deficits during the triennial period, transfer $472,718.25 from the Unreserved/Undesignated Fund to the Capital Improvement Reserve Fund for a total of $500,000; Unreserved/Undesignated Fund Balance of $234,180.50.
The City of Carmel-by-the-Sea would then have a total Fund Balance (Reserve Funds) of approximately $6,774,065.50 or 56% of an annual budget of $12 million; between 50% - 100% of annual revenues as recommended by the City’s Nicholson and Olson auditor.

COMMENTS:
With the City Council’s decision to decrease the city subsidy to Sunset Cultural Center, Inc., as promised three years ago, to $600,000 (FY 2007/08), $500,000 (FY 2008/09) and $400,000 (FY 2009/10), the City Administrator and City Council Members are confident that the savings will enable the city to more easily and equitably fund the needed capital improvements for neglected city cultural and historic assets for FY 2007/08 through FY 2009/10.

After 30 minutes of deliberations, the mayor and city council members were unanimous in their collective regret that they had in the past violated Ordinance No. 96 (see Reference below), the “heart and soul of Carmel-by-the-Sea,” and pledged to earn the public’s confidence and trust by funding for residential needs, including the renovation and ADA compliance of the Scout House; the renovation, rehabilitation and ADA compliance of the dilapidated Forest Theatre; the rehabilitation of the Flanders Mansion; and a commitment to annually fund the Scout House, the Forest Theatre and the Flanders Mansion for basic maintenance needs.

Reference:
THE CITY OF CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA is hereby determined to be primarily, a residential City wherein business and commerce have in the past, are now, and are proposed to be in the future subordinated to its residential character; and that said determination is made having in mind the history and the development of said city, its growth and the causes thereof; and also its geographical and topographical aspects, together with its near proximity to the cities of Pacific Grove and Monterey and the businesses, industries, trades, callings and professions in existence and permissible therein.
Adopted by Ordinance No. 96 passed on this 5th day of June 1929


APRIL FOOLS!